singles by choice
(albums when it's necessary)
25 June 2013
(listening through speakers)Avid Acutus
Funk F·XRII
Linn Akurate DS
TEAD Groove Anniversary
TEAD Vibe / Pulse 2
TEAD Linear A
TEAD Model One

I liked the first singles and most of the first album a lot, then they went a bit more “indie rock”, and slightly lost me. The A-side here is a lot more indie rock, and I’m not sure I’m all that keen. Seems a bit of a waste of George’s voice for a start. The b-side is what you’d think of as “classic” Crookes, and it’s great. As usual the words are razor sharp, and bitter-sad; lyrical and brilliant. “You may smoke in black and white/but you should always dance in colour”? Come on!

3

God, this is old-skool. Typed, photocopied, folded sleeve in a plastic bag with that Ziploc type top that makes you think it was intended for food. So 1995, as The Saturdays might say. The label is pure Sarah, there’s even an insert that doesn’t fit, and the sound is as retro as the packaging. Side one is kind of like when Ringo Deathstarr do the Mary Chain, and it’s good. It has the best use of reverb so far this year. Or possibly any other year. Side two is a bit like The Normal or something, with some brilliant feedback at the end. And, it’s in mono, so you can use it to calibrate your bias and azimuth!

4

On Secretly Canadian, which is a consistently good label, this is two tracks of clipped, too-loud, over-compressed poppy shoegazey malarkey that makes me think of All Natural Lemon and Lime Flavors. Both sides have more hooks than an Abu Hamza convention, and I bloody love it. Best single I’ve bought in ages. More please!

5

You never know what you’re going to get with MoAM?. Well, you know it’ll be one of three things: something rocky, something surfy, or something noisy. Here, you get all three, in that order, and all three are, of course, great. You also know you’ll get fantastic packaging, and here we have a beautiful printed raw card sleeve with concentric dials detailing the layers of the atmosphere, the planets, something to do with solar activity and god knows what else. One side of the hole in the middle has lovely clear red plastic, like a solar filter or something. It’s beautiful. I’m so glad they’re back, and still so damn fine.

4

A deep blue vinyl split from 2011. Füxa now sound nothing like Füxa, and here do a forgettable song with a girl singing. Said girl has a nice voice. Dean is Dean Wareham from off of out of Luna and/or Galaxie 500, and Britta I think makes water filters. Their song is lovely, with echoing Velvet Undergroundish guitars, a nice Leslie cabinet organ (which is probably the “Füxa remix”: it sounds just like that organ that was all over the early records), and dreamy vocals. Bit of a cracker actually.

4

I always liked American singles, or Japanese. But maybe if you’re American or Japanese, then English singles are cooler. The grass is always greener. Or cooler. This is on Slumberland, which is one of my favourite labels, and it’s rough around the edges, bright and breezy US indie pop. I can definitely see how people might find the guy’s voice irritating, but I can just about cope with it. The whole thing is pretty ragged and ramshackle, like if New Bad Things had really got their act together. All over too quickly, and the title track’s the best.

4

I’m becoming very conservative in my choice of new music. Now there’s no music press to speak of, and I don’t read blogs or shit like Pitchfork, I’ve no idea what’s around, or what’s happening. So, I find myself sticking to artists and labels that I know. So here we have another record on the Great Pop Supplement. It’s in a nice hand-printed cardboard sleeve, and has no middle.

Side A is the kind of thing Tony Blackburn might play on pick of the pops if he were doing 1967. It’s US-styled, thoughtful pop. A little psychedelic, but not too much. B-side is a little less 60s, but marginally more rocky. Good stuff as ever.

3

More GPS. This one’s in a normal full-colour sleeve, and plays at 33rpm. High Wolf first, doing a repetitive folky thing; makes me think of Flying Saucer Attack without their distortion pedals, if you can imagine such a thing. Some noodling guitar comes in, that I don’t think Flying Saucer Attack could have coped with, so I’m out of “sounds likes” now. It’s a bit outside my sphere.

Kunlun’s song is also very repetitive, but they use electronics. It’s very relaxing and slightly state-altering, in the way Steve Reich is. Excellent.

3